Andreas Diekmann on Uri Geller in:

Empirische Sozialforschung. Grundlagen, Methoden, Anwendungen. Hamburg 2009, delivers a clear&distinct explanation on ‘how come thousands of recipients of Geller’s famous TV experiments called back the station and reported they had found bent forks in their kitchen’–or spoons [pp 51].

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Patrice – No Excuse

“This is about music, so don’t confuse it.”

Samy DeLuxe – weck mich auf

so what is magic

In Second Life I have had two conversations on what constitutes magic that especially have stuck to my mind.

One of those I had with my neighbour and friend Free, who commented on a set of visual effects I made. That was a tool to animate particles on music, a simple particle organ I called The Wheel [.mov by Eif ty, man. *smiles. I totally do love it by now and I am happy it is there! Recorded at Gallery Diabolus, Benvolio, Second Life 2008. Special credits also to SomaFM free i-net radio!].

After I publicly performed and improvised visuals to music that was streamed in at Free’s place in SL, the ‘wow-effect’ was central to her argumentation when I asked her what made her call my effects ‘magical’. I concluded that was about not knowing how to create such oneself.

Later that year I had the opportunity to attend the NPIRL Garden of Delights artist talk given by Tuna Oddfellow. He and his beautiful assistant Shava Suntzu replied to my question on what constitutes magic that having succeeded to make someone ‘wow’ indicated that you were performing it.

As I had just thrown together components that are openly accessible to everyone and modded free LSL scripts the basic principle seems to be ‘many can, few do’.

not to be confused with manna

“Mana is the concept of an impersonal force or quality that resides in people, animals, and inanimate objects. The concept is common to many Oceanic languages, including Melanesian, Polynesian, and Micronesian.

In anthropological discourse, mana as a generalized concept has attained a significant amount of interest, often understood as a precursor to formal religion. It has commonly been interpreted as ‘the stuff of which magic is formed’, as well as the substance of which souls are made.

Modern fantasy fiction and computer and role-playing games have adopted mana as a term for magic points—an expendable resource out of which magic users form their magical spells.

Mana should not be confused with the Biblical manna (also spelled mana or mannah) which, according to the Bible (Exodus, chapter 16), provided sustenance for the Israelites. (…)”

via.